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FAQ

1. What is the difference between Text and Cover stock?
2. What is the difference between Offset and Coated (Matte or Gloss) Stock?
3. What is the difference between Matte and Gloss stock?
4. What is the difference between 100 lb text stock and 14pt card stock?
5. What is NCR paper?
6. What is the Stock Color?
7. What is the Finished Size?
8. What is Full or 4 Color Process Printing?
9. What are Spot Colors?
10. What is Cerlox Binding?
11. What is Spiro Binding?
12. What is Perfect Binding?
13. What is Stitching?
14. What is Perforation?
15. What is Gathering?
16. What is Padding?
17. What is Varnishing?
18. What file formats do you accept?

 
1. What is the difference between Text and Cover stock?
Commercial printing paper is divided into two broad categories: Coated and Uncoated (sometimes referred to as offset stock). Within each of those categories are sub-categories by weight - Text and Cover stock. Text stock is the lighter weight paper used most frequently for the inside or body of a book or catalog, letterheads, flyers, newsletters. It is less expensive than cover weight paper. Card stock is a heavier and more durable paper used for the outside cover of a book or catalog, business cards, post cards, tickets. The heavier the paper's weight with a resulting greater thickness, the more upscale is the look and feel that will be achieved.

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2. What is the difference between Offset and Coated (Matte or Gloss) Paper Stock?
Offset stock is uncoated paper. Uncoated stock is a rough porous type of paper. Offset is most commonly used for 1-color pages in books, reports, letters and business forms. Coated stock has a smooth finish. Printing on this type of paper will sharpen your text and graphic layouts. Coated stock, however, can be a bit more expensive.
 
 
3. What is the difference between Matte and Gloss stock?
Matte is a coated stock with a dull finish. It is often used to make pages easier to read that are text or type intensive. Gloss stock is a coated paper with shinny or highly reflective finish. It is most often used in full color printing to have full color photographs, images and graphics appear more vivid, real and appealing.

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4. What is the difference between 100 lb text stock and 14pt cover stock?
14 pt is measured in thickness. 100 lb text is measured in weight. It can be hard to differentiate between the two unless you know both weight and thickness. The point system, measures paper thickness, not weight, and is typically used with coated cover papers.
 
 
5. What is the NCR Paper?
(No Carbon Required paper) A multiple-part paper form that does not use carbon paper. The ink is adhered to the reverse side of the previous sheet.

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6. What is the Stock Color?
The color of the paper or other material prior to printing.
 
 
7. What is the Finished Size?
The dimensions of a printed product after it has been cut.

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8. What is Full or 4 Color Process Printing?
High quality, full color commercial printing is done on offset presses using a four- color build process called CMYK. CMYK stands for Cyan (blue), Magenta (red), Yellow and Black. These four colors are used to create or build the multitude of color shades seen in a vibrant, full color printed piece. Your computer monitor is in RGB (Red, Green, Blue). Because of this different color model and the wide variation in monitor technologies and calibration, the colors will be similar, but not exact.
 
 
9. What are Spot Colors?
Spot colors are used most frequently for one and two color printing jobs and when an exact color needs to be produced every time. Logos are perfect examples for spot colors. The Pantone matching system (PMS color) is most frequently used for selection and printing of spot colors.

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10. What is Cerlox Binding?
A half tube that has curved teeth (similar to a comb) that fit through rectangular holes along the text. The teeth bend behind the solid part of the tube, holding the papers together. Inserts can be added after binding.

 
 
11. What is Spiro Binding?
Spiro binding involves punching small round holes through a document and threading round plastic coils through the binding area. It is often used for manuals and long booklets as it is cost effective in both large and small quantities. The booklet stays open when lying flat.

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12. What is Perfect Binding?
Perfect binding is a form of adhesive binding. This binding is sometimes called a "soft cover", which is similar to a paperback novel binding. It is excellent for books, corporate reports, manuals, brochures, and annual reports.

 
 
13. What is Stitching?
Saddle stitching is the most common binding. The pages are stapled together through the center of the spine of folded sheets. A variation on saddle stitching is side stitching. It is another means of joining pages of a printed piece together by stapling through the cover along the binding edge.

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14. What is Perforation?
Perforation is a line of very small holes punched into the paper. This allows the parts of the perforated area to be separated from one another by simply folding and tearing along the dotted line. It is most often used for tickets, raffle tickets, coupons, gift certificates, forms that need to stay intact until the stub is collected.
 
 
15. What is Gathering?
Gathering is placing together the sections of a book in correct sequence for binding.

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16. What is Padding?
Padding is the process of using an adhesive to join pages into a pad form. It is most often used for note pads, business forms, invoices, questionnaires.
 
 
17. What is Varnishing?
Varnishing is coating the previously printed work with "transparent ink" for glossy appearance and protection.

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18. What file formats do you accept?
We accept the following formats:
Microsoft Publisher, Word, Excel, Powerpoint
Corel DRAW, PHOTO-PAINT, WordPerfect
Adobe Pagemaker, InDesign, Illustrator, Photoshop, Acrobat
Quark XPress
Macromedia Freehand, Fireworks
EPS, JPG, TIFF formats.


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